Preserve your branded choice:

Indicate “Dispense as Written” (DAW) on your Valcyte prescription or through your e-prescribing tool

Each state has its own laws to govern generic substitution by a pharmacist. It is important to follow
guidelines for the state in which the prescription is filled, which may not be the state in which the
prescription is written.

If you are e-prescribing branded Valcyte and would like to preserve your branded choice, select branded Valcyte from the medications list, not valganciclovir, and then take appropriate action in the
e-prescribing system to avoid generic substitution.

  • Provide a written prescription for your patients' records and indicate “Dispense as Written,” according to your state's guidelines.
  • If branded Valcyte is not an option in the medications
    list, consider contacting your local administrator to update the system to include Valcyte.

If you decide to prescribe branded Valcyte for your patients—
Indicate “Dispense as Written” according to your state's DAW laws

Review the DAW laws in your state

Alabama

Prescriber’s signature on appropriate line of two-line prescription.

Alaska

To prevent DPS, prescriber must expressly indicate in some manner.

Prescriber must write in own handwriting, in addition to signature, “Brand Necessary.”

Arizona

Prescriber must expressly indicate that substitution is not allowed.

Arkansas

To prevent DPS, prescriber must expressly indicate in some manner.

Prescriber must write in own handwriting, in addition to signature, “Brand Necessary.”

California

Prescriber may indicate orally or in own handwriting “Do Not Substitute” or similar words. Allows use of a preprinted “Do Not Substitute” box, provided that the prescriber personally initials the box.

Colorado

Prescriber must handwrite “Dispense As Written” or hand-initial a preprinted box labeled “Dispense As Written.” May also be done electronically.

Connecticut

Prescriber must write in own handwriting “DAW” or “Dispense As Written.”

Prescriber indicates “Medically Necessary” in own handwriting.

Delaware

Prescriber must write in own handwriting “Brand Necessary” or “Brand Medically Necessary.”

District of Columbia

To prevent DPS, prescriber must expressly indicate in some manner.

Florida

To prevent DPS, prescriber must expressly indicate in some manner.

Georgia

Prescriber’s signature shall validate the prescriptions and, unless the prescriber handwrites “Brand Necessary” or “Brand Medically Necessary,” shall designate approval of drug substitution by the pharmacist.

Guam

A licensed practitioner shall prohibit drug product selection by handwriting the words “No Substitution” or the diminutive “No Sub” on the face of the prescription.

Hawaii

Prescriber must indicate “Brand Necessary” or “Brand Medically Necessary” in own handwriting or product selection is allowed.

Refer to the Department of Health, Food and Drug Branch.

Idaho

If a prescriber orders by any means that a brand-name drug must be dispensed, then no drug selection is permitted.

Illinois

Prescriber must indicate “May Not Substitute” by marking a designated box. See Section 225 ILCS 85/25.

Indiana

Prescriber’s signature on appropriate line of two-line prescription.

Iowa

Prescriber must expressly indicate that substitution is not allowed.

Kansas

Prescriber’s signature on appropriate line of two-line prescription.

Prescriber must expressly indicate that substitution is not allowed.

Kentucky

To prevent DPS, prescriber must expressly indicate in some manner.

"Brand Medically Necessary" to be handwritten on the face of the prescription by the prescriber for Medicaid patients, or product selection is allowed.

May indicate, in manner of his or her choice, on the prescription "Do Not Substitute," except that the indication shall not be preprinted on a prescription.

Louisiana

Box must be checked to prevent DPS.

Maine

To prevent DPS, prescriber must expressly indicate in some manner.

Box must be checked to prevent DPS.

Maryland

“Brand Medically Necessary” to be handwritten on the face of the prescription by the prescriber for Medicaid patients, or product selection is allowed.

Prescriber must expressly indicate that substitution is not allowed.

Massachusetts

To prevent DPS, prescriber must expressly indicate in some manner.

Must indicate "No Substitution."

Michigan

Prescriber must write in own handwriting “DAW” or “Dispense As Written.”

Minnesota

Prescriber must write in own handwriting “DAW” or “Dispense As Written,” unless the prescription is transmitted electronically in accordance with Code of Federal Regulations, Title 42, Section 423.

Mississippi

Prescriber’s signature on appropriate line of two-line prescription.

Missouri

Prescriber's signature on appropriate line of two-line prescription.

Montana

"Brand Name Medically Necessary" shall be handwritten (or printed if electronically generated) on the face of the prescription if it is medically necessary that an equivalent drug product not be selected.

Nebraska

To prevent DPS, prescriber must expressly indicate in some manner.

Nevada

To prevent DPS, prescriber must expressly indicate in some manner.

Prescriber must write in own handwriting "Dispense As Written."

New Hampshire

To prevent DPS, prescriber must expressly indicate in some manner.

The prescribing practitioner handwrites "Medically Necessary" on each paper prescription, or uses electronic indications when transmitted electronically, or gives instructions when transmitted orally that the brand-name drug product is medically necessary.

New Jersey

Prescriber's signature on appropriate line of two-line prescription.

New Mexico

A licensed practitioner shall prohibit drug product selection by handwriting the words "No Substitution" or the diminutive "No Sub" on the face of the prescription.

New York

Prescriber must indicate "Dispense As Written" in the designated box, or positively indicate brand for electronic prescriptions.

"Brand Medically Necessary" to be handwritten on the face of the prescription by the prescriber for Medicaid patients, or product selection is allowed. An alternative provision that requires positive indication for electronic prescription.

North Carolina

Prescriber’s signature on appropriate line of two-line prescription.

To prevent DPS, prescriber must expressly indicate in some manner.

North Dakota

To prevent DPS, prescriber must expressly indicate in some manner.

Prescriber must write in own handwriting, in addition to signature, "Brand Medically Necessary."

Ohio

Prescriber must write in own handwriting "DAW" or "Dispense As Written."

Oklahoma

O.S. (1961) states that it is unlawful for a pharmacist to substitute without the authority of the prescriber or the purchaser.

Oregon

A practitioner may specify in writing, by a telephonic communication, or by electronic transmission that there shall be no substitution for the specified brand name drug in any prescription. May not use default values on the prescription. For an electronically transmitted prescription, the prescriber or prescriber's agent shall clearly indicate substitution instructions in the prescription drug order as well as all relevant electronic indicators sent as part of the electronic prescription transmission.

Pennsylvania

Prescriber’s signature shall validate the prescription and, unless the prescriber handwrites "Brand Necessary" or "Brand Medically Necessary," shall designate approval of drug substitution by the pharmacist.

Puerto Rico

Prescriber must write on the face of the prescription in own handwriting the phrase "Do Not Interchange."

Rhode Island

Prescriber’s signature shall validate the prescription and, unless the prescriber indicates "Brand Necessary" or "Brand Medically Necessary," shall designate approval of drug substitution by the pharmacist.

Patient may request, in writing, that the brand name be dispensed.

South Carolina

Prescriber’s signature on appropriate line of two-line prescription.

South Dakota

To prevent DPS, prescriber must expressly indicate in some manner.

Prescriber must write in own handwriting, in addition to signature, "Brand Necessary."

Tennessee

The prescriber shall, in the prescriber’s own handwriting, include on the prescription the following language (but not limited to): (1) "Brand Name Medically Necessary," "Dispense As Written," "Medically Necessary," "Brand Name," "No Generic"; or (2) Any abbreviation of the language in the section above; or (3) Any other prescriber handwritten notation, such as circling a preprinted "Dispense as Written" on the prescription order, that clearly conveys the intent that a brand name is necessary for the patient.

Texas

Prescriber must indicate "Brand Necessary" or "Brand Medically Necessary" in own handwriting or product selection is allowed.

Utah

To prevent DPS, prescriber must expressly indicate in some manner.

Allows use of preprinted "Do Not Substitute" checkbox.

Vermont

Prescriber must write "Brand Necessary," "No Substitution," "Dispense As Written," or "DAW" in own handwriting.

(See Sec 4.18 V.S.A. §4606 Brand Certification.)

Virginia

"Brand Medically Necessary" to be handwritten on the face of the prescription by the prescriber for Medicaid patients, or product selection is allowed. For all non-Medicaid patients, phrase must be included, but not required to be handwritten.

Washington

Prescriber’s signature on appropriate line of two-line prescription.

West Virginia

To prevent DPS, prescriber must expressly indicate in some manner.

Prescriber indicates "Medically Necessary" in own handwriting.

Prescriber must indicate "Brand Necessary" or "Brand Medically Necessary" in own handwriting or product selection is allowed.

Wisconsin

To prevent DPS, prescriber must expressly indicate in some manner.

Wyoming

Prescriber must expressly indicate that substitution is not allowed.


Laws governing generic substitution vary by state

Each state has specific guidelines on how to write a prescription to preserve your choice of branded medication.
Please review your local laws for any changes in requirements.